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Study: Connecticut Criminal Arrests, Murders Hit A 10-Year Low

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced a report that showed a sharp decline in murders and gun-related violence in Connecticut last year.
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced a report that showed a sharp decline in murders and gun-related violence in Connecticut last year. Photo Credit: File
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced a report that showed a sharp decline in murders and gun-related violence in Connecticut last year.
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced a report that showed a sharp decline in murders and gun-related violence in Connecticut last year. Photo Credit: File

FAIRFIELD COUNTY, Conn. -- The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner reported 97 murders in Connecticut last year, down from 146 in 2012, the third fewest recorded in the state in the past 40 years, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy recently announced.

The statewide decline in murders is even more significant considering that the number of murders over the last 20 years has fallen 55 percent even though Connecticut’s population has continued to grow. The peak was in 1994 when 216 murders were recorded.

“Since taking office, my administration has been coordinating with numerous law enforcement agencies to take aggressive steps to reduce crime and restore the public’s confidence in the criminal justice system,” Malloy said in a statement.

“All told, the various state criminal justice entities, working closely with federal agencies and local police departments, have made dramatic improvements concerning the safety of our citizens. Our cities and towns are undoubtedly safer than they were five years ago, as evidenced by the dramatic reduction in statewide murders and the reduction of shooting incidents in our urban centers.”

Malloy highlighted several statewide initiatives and partnerships implemented or supported by the state to reduce murders and nonfatal shootings, especially in Connecticut’s three largest urban centers: Bridgeport, Hartford and New Haven. Those include: strengthened gun safety laws, a $3.5 million state investment to community organizations that work to combat youth violence, efforts by law enforcement to focus on violent crimes and illegal guns and juvenile justice reforms.

“No question, we must remain vigilant,” Malloy said in a statement. “In some of our urban centers we have much work to do. But these steady signs of progress are encouraging. I want to thank law enforcement and community leaders for their constant diligence in working toward a solution to this problem.”

Click here to view the full report.