Stamford Urges Residents To Prepare For Hurricane Season

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Hurricane Sandy tore through Stamford's Barlett Arboretum, causing heavy damage to its cottage.
Hurricane Sandy tore through Stamford's Barlett Arboretum, causing heavy damage to its cottage. Photo Credit: Peter Saverine, File photo

STAMFORD, Conn. -- Although the forecast is calling for a hurricane season that will be less severe than normal, Stamford Mayor David Martin said the city has to be prepared.

“You could have fewer events but more severe events, or more events that are less severe, but we need to be prepared either way,” Martin said Thursday. He attended an emergency preparedness session in the morning in the Emergency Operations Center that focused on hurricanes.

The hurricane season officially begins June 1 and ends Nov. 30. This week is national Hurricane Preparedness Week.

City Director of Public Safety Thaddeus Jankowski said Stamford holds monthly emergency preparedness sessions and said this month they focused on hurricanes.

“We always prepare -- doesn’t matter what is predicted,” he said. “To make sure that we can respond to, mitigate and recover from any incident, whether it is a hurricane, a natural disaster or a man-made disaster.”

He also urged city residents to make preparations to help them ride out any storms or other disasters as best as possible.

The city recommends that every resident develop an emergency plan, create an emergency supply kit and develop a family communications plan to ensure loved ones can find one another before and after a severe storm. 

Hurricane preparedness information can be found by logging onto www.BePreparedStamford.org website and follow the link to “Stamford Be Prepared” website. 

Residents are also urged to register for Stamford Alert, Stamford’s Emergency Notification System, which is on the “Stamford Be Prepared” website.

“I recommend that all Connecticut residents take three simple preparedness steps now: Get a kit, make a plan, and stay informed. Carefully monitor weather reports and promptly follow instructions from public safety officials if a storm approaches," State Emergency Services and Public Protection Commissioner Dora B. Schriro said. 

Connecticut was hit by Hurricane Irene in 2011 and Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Both storms caused massive damages, flooding and power outages across the state of Connecticut. 

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