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Hurricane Sandy Damage Being Assessed In Stamford

A tree snapped in the front yard of a Haig Avenue home in Stamford Monday.
A tree snapped in the front yard of a Haig Avenue home in Stamford Monday. Photo Credit: Anthony Buzzeo
A large tree limb hangs on to the power lines on Newfield Avenue after Hurricane Sandy hit Stamford.
A large tree limb hangs on to the power lines on Newfield Avenue after Hurricane Sandy hit Stamford. Photo Credit: Anthony Buzzeo

STAMFORD, Conn. — The City of Stamford began assessing and cleaning up destruction Tuesday morning caused by Hurricane Sandy.

More than 35,000 Connecticut Light & Power customers were without power - about 63 percent of the city - as of Tuesday morning, Mayor Michael Pavia said during a press conference. In addition, 47 intersections were without power and 30 to 36 roads blocked by fallen trees and wires, he said.

Director of the Office of Operations Ernie Orgera said the power company will be returning power to those near main areas first and work out from there. He added that he has crews working to clear trees along Long Ridge Road, High Ridge Road, Hope Street, Newfield Avenue, Stillwater Avenue and Courtland Avenue.

The Citizens Service Center has been operating on a 24-hour basis with the help of staff and volunteers and will be serving people on a priority basis, Frank Fedeli, director of the service center said.

“We urge their patience and graciousness,” he said of Stamford residents, adding that about 560 calls were received during the storm.

Orgera said he had crews working to help people throughout the storm who were trapped from downed wires and tree limbs.

“We could not rest until all those people were safe,” he said.

The emergency shelters in the city filled up Monday night with more than 663 people camping out there as the storm hit, with 347 coming after the second wave of evacuations was announced, Ron Miller, of the city's Health & Social Services Department, said. People have begun to leave, but the shelters are still open, he added.

There are four elementary schools without power, and others that received “minor” flooding and roof damage, Superintendent Winifred Hamilton said. There will be no school Wednesday as first planned, and no decision has been made for Thursday and after, she said.

The mayor has not yet decided if Halloween will be moved from Wednesday. He expects a decision to come Tuesday afternoon once the damage is assessed.

The city is still unsure of when garbage collection will begin again.

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